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Big Gramma

Big Gramma

 

I am fat. My body mass index (BMI) is 42 which qualifies me as morbidly obese. Not just fat, mind you, but obese. MORBIDLY obese. I am also no longer young, and older people have a more difficult time losing weight due to changes in metabolism and the way calories are burned.

But I have grandsons, and I have a plan. I want to be able to play with those kids, to walk around the park, and keep up with them. I don’t want them to think of me as fat. So, I have this nifty little app on my smartphone (remind me to talk about smartphones in the future) which helps me keep track of my calories and my exersize.

I have tried to concentrate on those (yuk) healthy green foods, and limit my processed foods and what I call the bad carbohydrates. I don’t eat a lot of bread, and pasta is not really on my preferred list. Those (and the apple fritters) are very processed and almost pure carbohydrates, and are on my naughty list. Red beans and potatoes are moderately okay simply because they come that way without any further modifications.

I hit the gym every morning after I work, but I only do about 15 minutes on the stationary bike or the elliptical. I just can’t do any more, and I almost feel guilty. Almost, but not quite, because it is still 15 minutes more than I did last month.

Night shift workers have a greater tendency to have diabetes and be morbidly obese. Those who have a prominent belly are at risk for metabolic syndrome. I realize this risk, this risk for debilitating illnesses, and I choose to do something about it. No — I can’t change to day shift. But my co-workers and I are meeting at the local gym and using the treadmills, ellipticals, bikes and the weight lifting machines. I am sore. I can barely make it up the stairs. My arms and shoulders hurt. But I will meet my friends at the gym and do it again. I would rather just sit down and knit my mitts, but I know this is best.

This will be yet another adventure worth writing about, don’t you think?

 


 

Updated March 2018 — I wrote the above four years ago, January 2014.  I still have a BMI of just over 40.  I did get it down below 40 long enough to have one hip replaced, and I have to get it back down so I can get my other hip replaced.  I’ve changed a few things since then, and my greatest success is when I follow the Trim Healthy Mama plan.  But I still have grandsons, and I still have a plan.

 

http://georgielee.blogspot.com/2013/06/vintage-ads-for-dad-to-amuse-and-horrify.html

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Gramma Nettie is THAT kind

Yes, I am that kind of Gramma.  The kind the kids hate to get gifts from because they know exactly what it is.  In my case, hand knitted socks from home spun and dyed wool yarn. 

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Long about June or July, I trace around the little peoples feet, marking both the position of the ankle and the ball of the foot.  This one tracing gives me measurements for both mittens and socks.  Then I spin up the undyed wool. 

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This last year, Red Boy was old enough at 3.5 years to help out a bit.  He was very curious about the process of spinning, and he really got a kick out of thwacking the freshly dyed yarn against the side of the house before setting out to dry.

Yet, when he opened up his gift, he looked so dejected and forlorn, he cried – loudly – and tossed them away.  Orange Boy quickly followed suit.  Yellow Boy is still to young, but he cried too!

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I told their Momma that I expected them to get tired of socks at some point, perhaps at the ripe old age of nine, or so.  I just did not expect it to happen at 3.  My heart was broken, and try as I might, I did take it personally.  After all, this IS a competition for Granny supremacy!  My grand kids have to like me better than the other Gramma, right?  Now I think my chance for the title of Gramma of the year is jeopardized.  How can I repair this damage?

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Then I got a text from my daughter … “Guess who wanted his Christmas stockings before bedtime?”  Woo-hoo!  Who’s your Gramma now!?

 
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Posted by on 26 December 2015 in clothes, feelings, Grandmothers, Handspun, Knit, Socks, Wool

 

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Gramma Nettie’s New Clothes

I bought new clothes.

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This statement is so odd when you understand what a tight wad I am.  This is the first time in many years – and many pounds – that I purchased clothing that wasn’t from goodwill.  I am proud of my thrift, but being a cheapskate fat girl just doesn’t work.  You see, girls start out skinny, then gain weight as time goes on.  They give away the skinny clothes for more and more Xs in the label.  More girls need the fat lady stuff.  The laws of supply and demand kick in, with very diminished supply for my rotund demands.

I finally decided that I failed to lose weight, but that doesn’t mean I’m a failure.  I may be fat, morbidly obese, but I can still dress classy.  It just won’t happen on second hand things, I’m afraid.

Do, I did what any girl does … I went shopping.
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Posted by on 18 January 2015 in clothes, fat, feelings, obesity

 

Gramma Nettie’s influence

My baby has a birthday.  I had to do some quick math to discover her age, now.  I always say that with five kids their ages are always changing, and one simply cannot expect me to remember all of these ever-changing years.

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Great Grandmother photo by BillRuth

She is the mother of my two grandsons, and she is very competent at her job.  She was singing “It’s my party and I’ll sing what I want to.  Sing what I want to.  You would sing too, if it happened to you!”  Well, one of her friends pointed out that her words were not exactly what Lesley Gore sang in 1965.  Her response made my heart sing:  “My mother sang it that way, and so that’s what I sing.”

A woman has a surprising amount of influence on her children.  And on her grandchildren, it appears.  According to Susan Adcox, there are several things a grandmother can do to make a positive impact on them, including my favorite — valuing people above things.  Especially when a valuable item is broken, the first message should be “are you okay?”

I remember when I lived with my own grandmother for a year.  She explained how the rain makes the air smell different, better.  To this day, I think of her when I smell rain coming.  She introduced me to swordfish steaks, and to drying cheddar cheese on the counter (although I cannot remember what she was drying it for).  She gave my sisters and me big hugs when we arrived, and waved to us as we left until we were completely out of sight.  She taught me how to play rummy.  She was not perfect, and she wore baggy dresses with aprons and good sensible shoes.  Yet in my mind there was no other way for a Grandmother to look and be.  She was perfect to me. Understanding how I remember my own grandmother, I can appreciate (and, perhaps, guide) the perceptions my grandsons will have of me.

My plan is to influence them by reading to them; by introducing them to music with recorder and dulcimer; and by giving them their own family history so they know where they came from.  I want to teach them to cook what my mother called “soul food,”  usually red beans and rice.  She explained that her mother made this when there was nothing else available; that it was food “to keep body and soul together.”  I think of Momma when I serve this dish.  To me it is great food.  To her, she ate it because there was nothing else in the house.

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Gramma Nettie the RockStar photo by daughter

I want my grandchildren to remember me every time they listen to classical music, or every time they repeat one of my favorite phrases that I learned from my own mother.

Ready or not, like it or not, I am an influence to my grandchildren.  I must choose which direction that influence will take.

 

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Shared from WordPress

“Once we know that our deeply-held beliefs may instead be historically malleable, we can start to imagine how to make improvements”

Lara reviews a book called “Are we having fun yet?” a book about the feelings of angst and frustration with child rearing. 
You know those instinctive ideas of parenting?  The book’s premise is that they are not instinctive, but are learned behaviors.  Knowing that makes it easier to plan change.  Maybe a bit late for my own children.  But the information still might be useful.  This book is on my ‘to read’ list.

http://larafreidenfelds.com/2014/05/28/are-we-having-fun-yet-jennifer-seniors-smart-historically-informed-take-on-modern-parenting/

 
 

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