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How to cook some goofy grub part 4

Another Dessert category!  What’s not to love about ice cream!  from Boys’ Life Magazine

 

 

 

icecream

Ice Cream Football

THE CHALLENGE: Make ice cream without a freezer

EQUIPMENT:

  • 2 (1-quart) zip-top bags
  • 2 (1-gallon) zip-top bags
  • 1 (8-pound) bag of ice, crushed or in cubes
  • 1/2 cup rock salt
  • Newspaper
  • Heavy-duty tape

INGREDIENTS:

  • 1 cup whole milk
  • 1 cup whipping cream
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

You need milk, cream and sugar to make ice cream, plus rock salt and lots of ice. As long as the ingredients keep moving and stay cold enough, the mixture will turn into ice cream.

The Scouts measured the ingredients into a quart-size zip-top bag, and squeezed out all the air and sealed the bag. They placed this bag inside the other quart bag and sealed it. Then they put this double-bagged ice cream mix inside a gallon zip-top bag.

They then filled the gallon-size bag with ice, sprinkled the ice with rock salt and sealed the bag. They placed this bag inside the other gallon bag and sealed it again.

Now for the football part.

The Scouts wrapped the bags in layers of newspaper and secured the bundle with duct tape. The resulting “football” was ready for about 20 minutes of passing — to keep the mixture moving — before being spiked into the ice chest.

THE RESULT: The ice cream was cold and delicious.

 

 

Kerner, S., & Ogren-Hrejsa, O. (2018). How to Cook Some Goofy Grub. Retrieved from Boys’ Life: https://boyslife.org/outdoors/1264/goofy-grub/

 

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Kid Friendly Digital Activities Part 5

Kid Friendly Digital Activities Part 5

The Last of the series!

YouTube Collection

The Mighty Mommy has a couple of suggestions for Youtube, see her explanations below.

YouTube is one of the hottest “go to” places on the internet. The topics are endless and when monitored can be safe and entertaining for children of all ages.

NeoK12 is a fantastic collection of videos, arranged by subject, that have been individually reviewed by K-12 teachers. There are also quizzes, games and puzzles as well as a cool presentation creator that helps students create their own presentations within the site. Also cool is the How it Works section.

NeoK12 is a really great site with lots of possibilities.

vgosn_royalty_free_images_ribbon_border OhSoNifty.jpg

Some other possibilities include

  • Khan Academy youtube videos don’t tend to talk down to kids, with selections including macroeconomics, basic counting, cryptography, grammar, trigonometry, chemistry; for all ages, including the adult learners in your family!
  • Edudemic offers videos for educators, evidence answering whether students should take notes on a computer and other things for educators.
  • RefSeek is an aggregate of various online videos which you may find interesting, since I won’t list everything
  • CosmoLearning says it is a “free educationa website for students and teachers.”  Apparently it offers learning in Audiology, Blockchain, Civil Engineering, Dentistry (really?)
  • Coursera “provides universal access to the world’s best education, partnering with top universities and organizations to offer courses online.”  This is not a free course, with prices about 29$ to 99$, and courses in Data Science, Learning how to learn, and other adult-oriented classes.  An advanced child may find value in college-level learning.
  • WatchKnowLearn has a lot of educational offerings.  You can search their catalog easier by filtering for appropriate age groups, from 3 years to 18 years.  Their classes include Life Skills, Philosophy and Religion, Hobbies and Crafts, Social Studies, History, Science.  The whole lot.  I’m gonna be right back, I have to watch a few of them myself!
  • Quartz lists and describes several cool video learning websites, including Netflix Academy, The Magic School Bus 360; and video suggestions in Literature, US History, World History.
  • And, last but not least, Mighty Mommy includes quick and dirty tips on how to protect your grandchildren as they explore technology

 

Resources

 

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Kid Friendly Digital Activities Part 4

Kid Friendly Digital Activities Part 4
This may contain links to Amazon. If you click on it, I may get a small payment from your purchase. Thank you for your support.

This post was inspired by Mighty Mommy’s Quick and Dirty Tips. It is one part of her post on how to keep kids active during the summer months using Digital activities. Check out her extensive ideas!

Mommy Moose by Norm 2014

“Mommy Moose” by BadBird Photography 2014, used with permission

Online Art Lessons.

Very young kids all seem to love colouring, whether in books or on blank sheets of whatever paper you have lying around, colouring keeps them happy for quite a long time.

Mighty Mommy writes — “Thanks to cutting edge technology, there are now dozens of ways kids can get creative without touching a crayon or marker. The National Gallery of Art hosts an interactive site called NGAkids. Here, your young Picasso can learn all about art history by exploring a variety of on-line art-making tools where they can draw, paint and dabble. There are hours of inspired activities for all age levels (including parents!).” See Also: 4 Reasons You’ll Absolutely Love Adult Coloring Books

Oh, my goodness, and she ain’t kidding! Take a look, but don’t say I didn’t warn you!

Thanks to cutting edge technology, there are now dozens of ways kids can get creative without touching a crayon or marker.

Some other resources for different art lessons

At Jerry’s Artarama, Watch over 2,000 free video art lessons for all skill levels.

1841_Clip_Art__train

1841 Train, The Weekly Standard, Raleigh NC, 26 May 1841 page 3. Downloaded from Newspapers.com March 2017

“Our Free Video Art Lessons aren’t just for adults and serious artists, we have creative art video projects for kids, too! Encourage the creativity of your own budding artist and watch their imagination bloom. Enjoy spending quality time with your child or grandchildren in these easy and exciting projects, and make more than merely fun memories by fostering their artistic spirit! Learn painting, drawing, art projects and more”

Looking at just this one page, I find lessons on one- and two-point perspective, Cartoon drawing faces, characters, optical illusions. I found lessons on adding form and shading and shadowing; drawing hands and using the rule of thirds. I found also, lessons on screenprinting, paper mache, using oils, doing landscapes, watercolour resist and a pattern study on a cathedral. Cool stuff for adults, too!

Sparketh.com

Sparketh looks like it is designed for homeschool learners, which also means it works for everybody else. Online learning using video, worksheets, for five dollars. I haven’t signed up so I am not sure if it is for the entire site or if you pay 5$ for each lesson. Still not a bad price!

Give your child the best art education at home. Homeschool Curriculum; After School Learning; Self-Learning. Join for just 5$.

Learning art with Sparketh is fun and effective. Gain unlimited access to a library of 500+ bite-sized video lessons taught by talented mentors. With new courses added to the library weekly, you will never run out of new things to learn. Spark your creativity.

Printouts, worksheets and course files included at no extra cost. Ad free for ages 8-18. Over 500 video lessons in shading techniques, drawing a tree frog, drawing a glass of water, mixing with oil pate and balance in art among many others.

Khan Academy Art History

Sandro Botticelli, Magnificat Madonna, 1480–81, tempera on panel, Uffizi, Florence

I have always enjoyed viewing classic art pieces, trying to figure out how these people lived. Khan Academy is a classic in online education to begin with, especially for the STEM courses — Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics. But they also include Art History. These may be geared more for the older child, but you can learn to appreciate good art pieces together at any age. Here you can learn how to analyze works of art, learn about contrapposto, foreshortening and chiaroscuro. What’s not to like?

Resources

Botticelli, S. (1480). Magnificat Madonna. Retrieved from Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Renaissance_art#/media/File:Magnificatio.jpg

Butler, C. (2017, June 18). From Audiobooks to Art Lessons—5 Fun, Digital Activities for Kids. Retrieved March 26, 2018, from Mighty Mommy’s Quick and Dirty Tips: https://www.quickanddirtytips.com/productivity/learning/from-audiobooks-to-art-lessons-5-fun-digital-activities-for-kids

Jerry’s Artarama. (2018). Watch Over 2000 Free Video Art Lessons. Retrieved from Jerry’s Artarama: http://www.jerrysartarama.com/free-art-instruction-videos/skill-level/kids

Khan Academy. (2018). Art history. Retrieved from Khan Academy ARts and Humanities: https://www.khanacademy.org/humanities/art-history

NGAkids. (2017). NGAkids Art Zone. Retrieved from National Gallery of ARt: https://www.nga.gov/education/kids.html

Sparketh. (n.d.). Sparketh. Retrieved from Sparketh.com: https://sparketh.com/

 

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Kid Friendly Digital Activities Part 3

Kid Friendly Digital Activities Part 3

Audiobooks

Next up — listening to a good book.  Mostly excerpted from Mighty Mommy, with my own two cents thrown in for good measure.

 

Old-Book-Image-RoyaltyFree-GraphicsFairy.jpg

In Getting Kids to Read Over the Summerthe NEA states that children, especially those from low-income families, can lose up to three months of reading progress over the summer months.   “There are tons of books that students will fall in love with that can be used as hooks to the academically required books.”  — Mighty Mommy

Introduce your child to the Wide Wonderful World of audio books.  Your grandkids (and you) can listen here, you can listen there, you can listen anywhere!  Listen in the car, listen while doing chores (Gramma can have the kids do chores, too.  It’s good for them — but that is for another post).

Mighty Mommy suggests a resource called Reading Rockets, “a national multimedia literacy initiative offering information and resources on how young kids learn to read (Butler, 2017).”

In their article Listen and Learn with Audiobooks parents can glean some great advice on how to help kids take advantage of the wonderful world of audio books this summer and throughout the school year.  For a wide-variety of interesting audio books for the entire family visit Macmillan Audio (Butler, 2017).

 

How to choose the right story?

You want to start with familiar stories, ones you’ve already read aloud to them.  This way you change just one variable, the reading voice.

The format you choose should be easy for you both to use.  Most Grandmothers are familiar with the most obvious choice, Books on CD.  Some public libraries “carry Playaways, which are books pre-loaded onto MP3 player available for checkout. (Walker R., 2017).”  Doesn’t that sound cool?  Sort of like fast food for the ears.  My library system provides audio books through the service called OverDrive from which one can “borrow” the audio book by downloading it for a specific time, usually 14 days.  I personally don’t jump with joy over this format because it meant that I had to sign in to my library, then download and join in to OverDrive, and I have to listen to it through that app only.  But, I do have access to free popular books, as long as they are actually available.

The titles you choose should be ones recognized as High Quality.  Talk with your librarian for suggestions, or check out suggestions from Notable Children’s Recordings from the American Library Association or Reading Rockets’ Favorite Audio Books.  You should probably get input from your kids so they are more likely to actually listen rather than poking the toy dinosaur into his brothers’ ear.

Other online ways to obtain audio books include Audible and Tales2Go where you can subscribe to a very extensive catalog of audio content.  Both sites are paid subscription sites.  I can vouch for Audible, find they are good, but personally I cannot afford it.  Tales2Go subscriptions are primarily for Brick-n-Mortar schools as well as Homeschools with varying plans.  BUT, there is also a subscription for individuals, from 99$ for an annual subscription, 40$ for three months (enough to take you through the summer), and a monthly subscription which you get from the Play Store.

My personal favorite is Lit2Go, from Florida Center for Instructional Technology.  This is a free site (what’s not to love about free?) which includes downloadable MP3, of course — we ARE talking specifically about audio books.  But the site includes downloadable PDF form so you can print if you need to, or read from the screen.  Many stories also provide teacher notes and learning objectives, which make these stories that much more valuable.  However, my suggestion is to not go too deep into the teaching part.  The kids will learn much just by listening to good stories.  The vintage images from these classic public-domain books are priceless.

What to do (Walker R., 2017)

  • Listen to audio books together.

  • Offer some background information or a preview of the story to help your child focus his listening and more easily follow what’s happening in the story.

  • Feel free to stop listening. If an audio book isn’t engaging, try another!

  • Keep your young listeners in mind. While kids can listen on a higher level than they can read, some stories may be too complex for young listeners to follow and enjoy.

  • Don’t let audio books take the place of you reading aloud to your child or telling them stories. 

 

Here’s another free site.  Librivox  has loads of public domain books read by volunteers around the world.  My experience is largely great, although I have found some readers I just cannot listen to.  Often, you can find the same book read by a volunteer whose style is more compatible.  If not, then try the next suggestion ….

How about this idea?  Record yourself reading to the kids.  You need a quiet place to read out loud, a microphone you can find from Walmart or Amazon, and an app that will record your voice in MP3 format.  You will want to give life to the characters, using different voices.  Don’t be afraid to be crazy!  The kids eat it up, ask me how I know!  The crazier, the better.  And, don’t be afraid you will look stupid.  Your kids won’t know what hit them, just be you!  They love you no matter.

Old-Book-Image-RoyaltyFree-GraphicsFairy

https://www.tales2go.com/subscribe/?hsCtaTracking=7b4eef48-0cf7-479b-985c-b66b04d50285%7C95ce45e7-5ccd-41fa-bb49-5b49233686be#individual

https://www.audible.com/ep/kids-audiobooks

https://www.overdrive.com/

http://www.playaway.com/

http://www.readingrockets.org/article/listen-and-learn-audio-books

https://us.macmillan.com/audio/

http://www.nea.org/tools/55443.htm

http://www.ala.org/alsc/awardsgrants/notalists/ncr

http://www.readingrockets.org/booklists/our-favorite-audio-books

 

 

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DNA results

DNA results

via Why Doesn’t my DNA Show Native???

 

A family member recently had a DNA test resulted from Ancestry.com.  BadBird’s family history says his mother was descended from the Cherokee Indian tribe, and that was from her Grandmother, which would be Rosa Evelyn Davis Young.  The story went something like this —

 

Gramma Rosa was a full blooded Indian woman, with dark hair which she kept in braids, high cheekbones, and darker skin colouring.  She loved to fish.  In her old age, she took her fishing rod and hiked off to the river to catch some dinner.  She had to walk on the railroad tracks to get to her destination, and didn’t want to be caught by surprise by a train.  So, she did something she’d been taught by her Indian folks — she put her ear to the tracks to listen for a train.  She was deaf — or nearly so — and didn’t actually hear the train….

Now, I don’t actually have much information about her.  I don’t know her parents.  I don’t have a death date for her.  She was born August 1876, and died after 1930, but I don’t have a record of that event.  Which, while disappointing, actually does point to possible Native American heritage.

Back to the DNA.  I think the story is true to some extent, mostly because the people involved had no reason to lie, because my mother in law had quite Indian features, and because of this lack of information for Rosa.  But that family member’s DNA resulted with no Indian blood at all, even though she is a descendant of Rosa, herself.

This article explains quite well how this is possible.

Update:  I did a quick search on Ancestry.com for both Rosa Evelyn Davis Young and her husband Oliver Bebe Young.  No further results.  So, according to the information available we are right back where we started from … my children may, indeed, be part Cherokee, but we don’t have any evidence of such.  And, the fact that the DNA results are negative for Native American is not conclusive evidence AGAINST Indian heritage.

Resources

About Roberta Estes

Scientist, author, genetic genealogist. Documenting Native Heritage through contemporaneous records and DNA.

 

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Break the Monotony: Summertime Activities for the Kids

Melissa Purcell, who wrote in 2014 on her blog My Humorous Mommy Life! about some of the summertime activities to keep kids busy.

Homemade Slime: http://www.skiptomylou.org/2009/07/24/how-to-make-gak-slime/.  This is free of Borax, and has only two ingredients.  This page also has some other activities to try out, along with other slime recipes.

Yo Yo Balloons: http://www.skiptomylou.org/2010/06/24/yo-yo-balloons-from-jessica-of-zakka-life/ — instructions are all there, but the youtube video is no longer available.  However, I found one that gives you an easy idea to work with

 

Chalk Paint: http://www.skiptomylou.org/2009/07/27/chalk-paint/ — if you have a sidewalk, give the kids a chance to make huge art in public!  Starch and water and food colours.  Add foam brushes and kids and your work is done!

Homemade Playdough: http://www.skiptomylou.org/2008/08/26/homemade-playdough/ — another fun creative kinetic easy recipe.

33 Activities under 10$ that will keep your kids busy all summer:  http://www.buzzfeed.com/mikespohr/activities-that-will-keep-your-kids-busy-all-sum — Wow, they ain’t kidding!  Here are some of the offerings: Coloured tape to make roads in the bedroom, or an outdoor board game; Chalk and sponge bullseye game; Exploding paint bags; painting on wet glue with food colouring (seems like a great way to learn about the colour wheel, mixing colours and all that); DIY a throwing tarp; A Jenga-style tower out of cut up sponges; A river in the back yard (what kid can resist a river?); Taping a paper towel to the wall keeps toddlers busy; Pipe cleaners and a colander does the same; Use burlap to make a sewing station; Experimentation using water marbles;

Buy a 2-ounce pack for $7.99 here.

A cool science experiment yielding alien bubbles; Extract DNA from Strawberries!; run balloon rockets; Bowl using erasers and marble; string up the hallway for Mission Impossible; Make soap clouds; Popcorn Olympics; Giant Bubbles; Decorate T-shirts with crayons; Marble Racetrack; Outdoor obstacle course

Summer bingo: http://www.enjoyutah.org/2012/04/summer-bingo-with-resources.html

Get creative with science:  http://www.pinterest.com/redtedart/science/http://www.growingajeweledrose.com/2013/05/science-fun-for-kids.html — these pinterest ideas can get your child’s STEM on (Science Technology Engineering Mathematics).

STEM the summer Slide: http://www.middleweb.com/15579/ideas-activities-stem-summer-slide/ — another site with science experiment ideas, including a checklist to watch for as you do these activities.

 

Break the Monotony: Summertime Activities for the Kids.

Purcell, M. (2014, June 2). Break the Monotony: Summertime Activities for the Kids. Retrieved from My Humorous Mommy Life! And, the Many Inbetweens ….: https://myhumorousmommylife.wordpress.com/2014/06/02/break-the-monotony-summertime-activities-for-the-kids/

 

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Gramma Nettie’s Toothpaste 3

Gramma Nettie’s Toothpaste 3

Today some different ways to clean your teeth

Disclaimer — this post is not intended for medicinal purposes.  I do not make any medical claims nor do I provide advise.  I provide information about what I have found and do, you are advised to do your own research and make your own educated choices.

Warning!  — This post may contain links to Amazon products for which I may (or may not) receive some recompense.  Thank you for your support.

Paste-style tooth cleanser is only one way to clean teeth (not to include flossing — that would be another post, I think).  Some advocate using chewed up sticks.

 

4 reasons to break up with toothpaste, plus a whitening tooth powder recipe

 

Homemade Tooth Powder Recipe — from MommyPotamus

Note: Feel free to add or adjust ingredients based on your needs. For example, if you have very sensitive teeth you might want to skip the baking soda and salt at first, or if you want to focus on removing stains add a little more activated charcoal to the homemade tooth powder recipe.

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

Using a stainless steel or plastic spoon, mix all ingredients in a clean glass jar. To use, add a little to a wet toothbrush and brush as normal.

 


From the Food Renegade:  —  HOMEMADE TOOTHPASTE RECIPE: THE PLAYERS

product links are my amazon affiliate links

HOMEMADE TOOTHPASTE RECIPE: THE HOW-TO

Thankfully, I have a stainless steel blade on my food processor, so I have no qualms using my food processor to make this homemade toothpaste recipe.

Bentonite clay can act like a magnet attracting positively charged heavy metals from your utensils, so you only want it to come into contact with a truly stable metal like stainless steel (which is used to mine the clay).

  1. Place all dry ingredients in the food processor and pulse until well mixed.
  2. In a liquid measuring cup, mix coconut oil, essential oils, trace minerals, and water.
  3. Slowly pour the liquids into your food processor while continuing to pulse. Mix until smooth; add more water if necessary to reach desired consistency.
  4. Remove homemade toothpaste from food processor and store in a glass jar with a lid. This keeps rather well in a medicine cabinet, although with time the exposure to air may dry it out. If it starts drying out before you’ve had the chance to use it, just mix in a bit more water.

https://www.foodrenegade.com/homemade-toothepaste-recipe-remineralizing/

 


 

DO YOU LOVE THE “FOAMY FACTOR” OF TOOTHPASTE . . . From MommyPotamus

But not the chemicals used  to achieve it? This recipe is for you!

Just make sure to rinse your mouth thoroughly after brushing. It’s soap, so the aftertaste will remind you a lot of . . . soap. (And if that doesn’t sound good to you, try tooth powder. My kids think it so delicious they sometimes refuse to spit after brushing. It’s all food grade, so I’m okay with that.)

tooth-suds-soap-recipe

HOMEMADE TOOTH SUDS RECIPE

Ingredients:

Instructions:

  1. Add everything to a 4 ounce dropper bottle and shake thoroughly to mix. Apply a few drops to your toothbrush and brush as normal.

 


Flavour recipes from The Hippy Homemaker, using essential oils for adults, flavour extracts for the kids.  She uses Mountain Rose Herbal and Plant Therapy brands.

I include Amazon affiliate links, thank you for your support

ADULT TOOTHPASTE FLAVORS

KID’S TOOTHPASTE FLAVORS (OR ADULTS….I LIKE THEM TOO!!!)

 

Resources